Beneath the surface of the Mississippi Sound, where its waters meet the blue-green Gulf of Mexico, lie the remains of an island that served up spirits and casino gambling to patrons from across the country during the Prohibition era.

The fickle Isle of Caprice, known to earlier seafarers, rum runners and bootleggers as Dog Keys, roared for five years from 1926-30 before a combination of man-made and natural events caused the sandy key to wash away.

Ever since, the descendants of owner Walter Henry “Skeet” Hunt have maintained the taxes in hopes that the Isle of Caprice would rise again. And this summer, it will — in a sense.

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Originally published in The Clarion-Ledger, June 12, 2016, and online by USA Today